Ryika Hooshangi files for city council seat 4

By Miki Mullor
Editor

Ryika Hooshangi

Sammamish Plateau Water Commissioner Ryika Hooshangi filed a PDC report (Public Disclosure Committee) yesterday, indicating intent to run for Sammamish City Council seat 4.

Hooshangi ran for city council in 2017 and lost in the primaries to Chris Ross and Rituja Indapure. Sammamish Comment endorsed Hooshangi and Ross in the primary and Indapure in the general election.

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Interview with candidate Rituja Indapure

By Celia Wu and Miki Mullor

Rituja Indapure

The Sammamish Comment sat down for an interview with City Council candidate Rituja Indapure. Indapure was a candidate in the 2017 election and lost to now Council Member Chris Ross. In 2018, Indapure was appointed to the City’s Planning Commission.

She has filed for the seat currently held by Tom Hornish, who is completing his first term. He has not declared whether he will run for another four-year term.

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Three weeks to city council candidate filing date

It’s three weeks to the first filing date May 12 for the August primary for local elections. So far, there are only two declared candidates for three Sammamish City Council seats up for election this year.

Only one of the three incumbents announced election plans; two others haven’t decided if they will seek reelection.

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Sammamish fire station hours reduced, fire engine removed

By Scott Hamilton

Staffed hours at Sammamish Fire Station 81 on 212th Ave. near SE 20th St. were reduced by half and the fire engine removed Jan. 1.

In what appears to be a series of communications failures, there was no notice to city residents in the service area.

Station 81’s service area is the light green color with 284 incidents. All but 80 occurred during the 8:30am-8:30pm period. The fire engine has been retired and an aid car (ambulance) now is staffed only during this 12 hour period instead of 24 hours. Source: Eastside Fire & Rescue.

Station 81’s service are is the western part of Sammamish from roughly just west of 228th Ave. SE to Thompson Hill Road on the north and Snake Hill Road on the south. The Station is located on 212th Ave. SE a half a block south of SE 20th St.

Continue reading “Sammamish fire station hours reduced, fire engine removed”

A Split City Council Votes to Oppose Sen. Palumbo’s “Minimum Density” Bill

Miki Mullor
Editor

In a 4/3 split vote, Sammamish City Council voted to officially oppose Sen. Palumbo’s bill to mandate upzoning in areas within the Urban Growth Boundary (UGB).   

Council member Chris Ross said:

“I am very strongly against ceding control over our community… to allow the state to take over our planning and treating an urban rural suburb [Sammamish] the same as core urban city like Seattle is completely irresponsible”.

Continue reading “A Split City Council Votes to Oppose Sen. Palumbo’s “Minimum Density” Bill”

In a historic vote, Sammamish City Council takes a stand on over-development

By Miki Mullor

Analysis

On Tuesday night, the Sammamish City Council drew a line in the sand on over-development, forcing a potential pause on development until a much needed public infrastructure is built.  

A split council voted on an esoteric traffic engineering parameter that decides what is the accepted level of traffic congestion the city is willing to tolerate.  

In doing so, the council have possibly made Sammamish the first jurisdiction in the Puget Sound to be implementing the Growth Management Act (GMA) the way it was originally intended to – to protect the citizens’ quality of life.

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Financial statements show Seattle YMCA siphons at least $1.4m annually from Sammamish

SAMM_LocationThe Sammamish Community Center, a $33m facility funded with $28m of  Sammamish taxpayers’ money and operated exclusively by the Y, generated at least $1.4m in surplus that is being sent to Seattle Y, raising questions regarding accounting methods.

The Community Center exceeded all expectations set forth in the city’s original plan.  The city thought the Community Center will attract 1,750 members, with a monthly membership rates for a family at $68.  In reality, more than 5,700 memberships were sold, with monthly membership rates for a family at $138.

The difference is sent to Seattle, although it supposed to stay in Sammamish.

Continue reading “Financial statements show Seattle YMCA siphons at least $1.4m annually from Sammamish”