Breaking News: Rituja Indapure announces candidacy for city council

Rituja Indapure

Planning Commissioner Rituja Indapure, who ran for Sammamish City Council in 2017, has announced today on her Facebook page a campaign for city council in 2019.

After losing the 2017 to Council Member Chris Ross, Indapure was appointed in 2018 to the Planning Commission by City Council.

Indapure is the first person to announce candidacy for the city council in the November 2019 election.

She, along with Ross, won the 2017 August primary in a three person race. Ross received about 52% of the primary vote and went on to win the general election by a similar margin.


The Comment endorsed Indapure in that race.


This year, three seats are up for election, held by incumbents Mayor Christie Malchow, Tom Hornish, each completing their first terms; and Ramiro Valderrama, who is completing his second term. None has indicated reelection plans.

She has not indicated which seat she will seek.

Indapure’s 2017 questionnaires:

 

Get real time updates to your email when news are posted. Your email will not be shared with third parties

Join 1,061 other followers


Sammamish community acts to counter racist graffiti; rally tomorrow

By Celia Wu

The Sammamish community is acting to counter a series of racist graffiti vandalism in the Klahanie area, organizing a rally tomorrow (see below) and GoFundMe campaigns in support of the victims.

Some residents of Klahanie woke up  Feb. 20 to racist graffiti scrawled over their property.

According to Sergeant Christine Elias of the Sammamish Police Department, 17  people were targets, with reports still coming in Friday. Property vandalized included cars, garage doors, mail boxes, street signs, and even a cement dumpster.

Continue reading “Sammamish community acts to counter racist graffiti; rally tomorrow”

Residents protest 42nd St barricade removal

  • Safety cited opposing barricade removal
  • Sound Transit outlines Sammamish Park and Ride
  • Intra-Sammamish transit study pushed
  • Taxes needed for 11 more police officers

By Paul Stickney

The 42nd St. barricade between the Timber Ridge and Hidden Park neighborhoods has been a source of controversy for years. Safety issues are cited against removing the barricade.

Nearly two dozen residents from the Timberline and Hidden Ridge subdivisions protested Tuesday over the possibility that Sammamish might consider removing the 42nd St. barricade, a controversial idea that previous city councils rejected.

The barricade has safety and design issues that residents say make removing it dangerous.

City officials previously considered it as a way to improve connectivity and traffic flow in the far northwest corner of the city and to relieve traffic pressure on SR202 from Sahalee Way.

Continue reading “Residents protest 42nd St barricade removal”

New taxes, 42nd St barricade removal, road improvements recommended

Feb. 19, 2019: The Sammamish city manager is laying the groundwork to the city council to impose the first utility tax of up to 3%, to begin imposing annual 1% property tax increases and to undertake pinpoint traffic improvements—including the controversial removal of the 42nd St. barricade in Timberline.

These proposals are in the packet for tonight’s city council meeting, beginning at PDF page 65.

Continue reading “New taxes, 42nd St barricade removal, road improvements recommended”

A Split City Council Votes to Oppose Sen. Palumbo’s “Minimum Density” Bill

Miki Mullor
Editor

In a 4/3 split vote, Sammamish City Council voted to officially oppose Sen. Palumbo’s bill to mandate upzoning in areas within the Urban Growth Boundary (UGB).   

Council member Chris Ross said:

“I am very strongly against ceding control over our community… to allow the state to take over our planning and treating an urban rural suburb [Sammamish] the same as core urban city like Seattle is completely irresponsible”.

Continue reading “A Split City Council Votes to Oppose Sen. Palumbo’s “Minimum Density” Bill”

Top 10 stories of 2018

The Top 10 stories in Sammamish for 2018 revolved around traffic, the building moratorium and—surprisingly—a state legislative action concerning public records.

The Sammamish Town Center was the focus of controversy in 2018, connected to many of the Top 10 stories for the year.

Here are the stories most viewed on Sammamish Comment for the year. Continue reading “Top 10 stories of 2018”

Time for fresh approaches

By Scott Hamilton
Founder, Sammamish Comment

The Sammamish City Council held its last meeting of 2018 yesterday, ending the most contentious and divisive year I’ve seen since the incorporation vote in 1998.

As 2019 prepares to arrive, it’s time for a fresh approach to how this city is governed.

The city council, administration and staff has been consumed by traffic concurrency, the resulting building moratorium and related development regulations all year—really, since October 2017, when the moratorium was adopted to give the government time to sort out the concurrency issues.

These issues consumed the city nearly to the exclusion of all else.

Continue reading “Time for fresh approaches”